The Best Results Come from Great Recovery

By: Coach Mike Klaus

You work hard in your workouts. You push yourself. You level up. You are putting in a lot of effort so why not make sure you are getting the most bang for you buck from them? The magic happens while you are recovering. The workout is the stimulus. During a workout you are actually damaging your muscle, creating micro tares. With proper recovery, your body repairs these tares and you are ready for your next workout a little stronger. Below are our favorite recovery activities to help you thrive in and outside of the gym and get the best results!

Foam Rolling

Foam Rolling offers many of the same benefits as a massage, including reduced inflammation, scar tissue and joint stress, as well as improved circulation and improved flexibility. Our favorite places to roll, especially for those who are at a desk all day include you calves, quads (tops of your legs). By rolling during pre and post workout, you will help prepare your muscles for the workout ahead and also help with post muscle recovery.

Check out Mike’s video on foam rolling! Need a foam roller? We have them at the studio!

Sleep

Achieving adequate and good quality sleep help to provide mental health, hormonal balance, and muscular recovery. Getting enough uninterrupted sleep, which is between 7-9 hours for most people, is crucial for optimal health. No matter what your goal, performance, fat loss, feeling better, or having more energy, without enough sleep, you will not reap all the benefits of the work you are putting in during the day.

Need some ideas on how to get more sleep? Check out Coach Suzanne blog post.

Deep Tissue Massage

Deep tissue massage can help with small or large muscle injuries or aid in the healing of chronic problems. Deep tissue massage targets deep muscles, tendons, as well as protective and connective tissue known as fascia. Those with chronic muscle tension or injury are more prone to adhesions, or thick “knots” that form in muscle fibers. These adhesions may not only be painful, but can disrupt blood flow and circulation, diminish natural movements, and result in inflammation. Undergoing deep tissue massages helps break down the adhesions and restore proper body functions.

Looking for a great massage therapist? Contact Johanna Mertensmeyer at 314-409-3724. Her studio is located in the Tower Grove area.

Nutrition

During recovery nutrition we remember the three R’s: refuel, rebuild, rehydrate.

Each of these critical recovery concepts calls for a different combination of fluids, carbohydrates, healthy fats, and protein—each playing a specific role in the recovery process. After training the body is left dehydrated, drained of fuel, and broken down.  The body is in a stressed state, and the proper blend of nutrients can jump-start the body’s recovery process to help you come back stronger and healthier.

If you are looking to optimize your nutrition for fat loss, performance, or just feeling better, email our Registered Dietitian, Suzanne at suzanne@forwardfitnessstl.com.

Cryotherapy

Cryotherapy triggers the release of endorphins, helps activate circulation, decreases inflammation by clearing toxins, and ultimately stimulates cellular regeneration, resulting in overall faster healing. Cryotherapy is used by elite athletes to improve muscle and injury recovery. Celebrities use it to slow down the aging process. And, clients can benefit from pain management, weight management, and relief of stress-related conditions to improve mental wellbeing.

Looking for a knowledgable and friendly place, check out Radiance Float + Wellness.

Eat – Sleep – Live Better: Recharging Your Batteries

Recovery is an extremely important part of the health puzzle. From workouts to high stress jobs and family stress to sleep deprivation, our bodies don’t seem to catch a break. Without intentionally making time and creating habits to recharge your batteries, you may be left with an empty tank  and trying to push through. When you get to this point it’s impossible to function optimally and progress in your health goals. Learn about different habits you can create to help you recover and be the best you possible!

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Can Weight Loss be as Easy as Sleep?

By: Suzanne Doerries RD, LD

Sleeping GirlWhen we think of weight loss or health, most of us think of exercise and nutrition. However, sleep plays a very important role. The average adult needs seven to nine hours of continuous sleep EVERY night.

Think about those nights when you don’t sleep well or get at least seven hours. How do you feel the next day? Are you able to think as clearly? Do you have lapses in your attention? Do you over react to situations? Chances are you answered yes to at least one of these questions.

In addition to the above, lack of sleep affects metabolic hormones. It decreases glucose tolerance affecting blood sugar levels.  It also decreases leptin and increases ghrelin. These are two hormones that have an effect on your appetite. Leptin tells the body that we have had enough to eat, while ghrelin tells us to eat. It’s the perfect storm, you are over emotional, don’t have control of your feelings, and feel hungry. How likely are you to make a healthy food choice especially when there is chocolate in the break room at work?  Multiple studies have shown that sleeping less than seven hours each night is associated with an increased BMI.

How can you improve your sleep? The first step is to make it a priority. If you are getting ample sleep you will be able to focus better and accomplish to-dos more efficiently. Here are some other tips to help insure a quality seven to nine hours of shut eye each night.

  • Turn off ALL light producing electronics at least 60 minutes before bed. Having complete darkness is really important to a good night’s sleep. Light affects melatonin levels which will affect your sleep.
  • Set a peaceful timer to remind you to get ready for bed. One of the most common reasons people do not get enough sleep is because they choose to stay up. Whether they get sucked in to a TV show or want to get in extra work the choice is made to stay up.
  • Create a calming bed time routine. You want to be relaxed when you go to sleep, not stressed.
  • Turn down the heat. Most experts say that the best temperature for sleep is between 65 and 68 degrees F. If you get too hot while you sleep you will wake up.
  • Avoid caffeine after noon or at least 6 hours before bed. Caffeine is a stimulant and can affect your sleep schedule.
  • Avoid alcohol. Any amount of alcohol can affect quality of sleep.
  • Exercise early. Exercising in the evening can make it hard for some people to fall asleep.
  • Breathe. Close your eyes. Breathe in and out through your nose without making any noise. You should not be able to hear yourself breathe. Your exhale should be twice as long as your inhale.

Don’t let a lack of sleep be the limiting factor to your health.