Could Your Beer Belly Really Be Anterior Pelvic Tilt?

By: Mike Klaus ISSA, RKC, FMS,

Hi. My name is Mike, and I have an anterior pelvic tilt (APT). Most people do, but mine is excessive and has been the cause of my training plateaus and low back injuries. It also makes me look like have a gut, which is not the case. (I am right around 8% body fat.) So, if you have any of this going on then you may be suffering from APT as well.

Anterior Pelvic Tilt

Anterior refers to the front side of your body and ‘pelvic tilt’ referrers to the pelvis being tilted to one side. APT tilts forward, like in the image below.

Mike Anterior TiltWhile researching APT I came across a wide variation to “acceptable” degrees of APT in men and women. I have come to the conclusion that optimal range for men is between 8-12 degrees and 12-16 in women. Of course each individual is different and more or less could be beneficial. You can estimate your own tilt by putting your back against the wall and measuring the space between the small of you back and the wall. A hand is the ideal amount of space. Significantly more could be problematic.

Initially my remedy was to simply rotate my pelvis externally and tuck my rib cage. I did constant checks and after a couple of weeks did notice an improvement in my posture. However, when I did anything physical my body would default back to that awful APT.  I needed to do more than walk around in neutral. My body needed to be trained so that deficient muscles could hold up to the required resistance I would ask of it.

There are several causes for APT and they include weak hamstrings, weak abdominals, weak glutes, tight hip flexors, and tight spinal erectors. Hip flexors are a group of muscles near the pelvis that move the hip forward during walking and running. Spinal erectors are group of muscles in the back that supports the spine.

In order to fix the problem and bring the pelvic tilt back to acceptable levels you will need to make the hamstrings, deeper abdominals, and glutes stronger and stretch the spinal erectors and hip flexors. Here are a few exercises that have helped me. (Of course be sure to check with your doctor before you diagnose yourself or try to do these exercises.)

  1. American Deadlift – Focus on and over emphasize the pelvic motion using a lighter weight than your typical barbell hinge. The movement ends with the pelvis in a posterior pelvic tilt really squeezing the glutes at lock out. 2-3 sets of 10.
  1. The Posterior Pelvic Tilt Hip Thrust – This is simply a bodyweight hip thrust using the glutes and emphasizing pelvic motion. 2-3 sets of 20-25.
  1. The RKC Plank – Setting up like a normal plank, only the focus is the squeezing of the glutes to achieve PPT. 2-3 sets of 3-5 :10-15 reps.

An anterior pelvic tilt can prevent you from progressing past a certain point in your training, cause injuries, and make you look like you have a big gut. It may require you to take a step back in your training program it is totally worth it in the long run.

The Heart is a Muscle

heart health artworkBy: Nick Lape BS, HFS, FMS, IYCA, CRBC

The media and grocery store are not shy about telling you what to eat for heart health. But, what about what you should physically do to improve your heart? If you think about it in one way it can be very easy to understand. The biggest trick is realizing that the heart is a muscle. In order to make it stronger you must use it. Because, everybody all together now, if “You Don’t Use It You Lose It!”

What does this mean? I guess one example would be to say that in order to make any muscle stronger the tissue must be able to expand and then contract in on to itself. Adding speed and/or overload is where these muscle fibers begin to get stronger.

No, technically, you can’t hand your heart a dumbbell and say go, but what you can do is make it beat faster or add speed. The electronic impulses of the heart can be sped up through cardiovascular exercise (cardio = heart). Many people achieve this by running long distances and while that may work, one of the best ways that I have personally found to strengthen the heart is through short bursts of speed followed by a little rest. This allows the muscles of the heart to pump hard and then rest as if you were asking it to do one set of reps. And again, just like any other muscles, we do multiple sets of exercises. When it comes to the heart you can’t treat it any different.

We look constantly to media sources in order to see what we think our body should look like on the outside, but what about the inside? If we don’t allow the muscles of our heart to work as hard as the muscles in our arms or legs then we are missing a HUGE part of our overall health. The next time you exercise, add a little speed to kettlebell swings/snatches, sprints or any of your exercises — any of these can increase your heart rate. A simple change in your workout can increase your heart health. Let us know if you need our help!

Don’t Train Before You Do This

By: Mike Klaus ISSA, FMS, RKC and Suzanne Doerries RD, LD, FMS

What is the FMS?

ffjune-205The FMS or Functional Movement System is the screening tool used to identify limitations and/or asymmetries in seven fundamental movement patterns crucial to everyday living. These are movements that not only allow you to train to your full potential, but ones that you do every day. Whether you are walking, carrying your child, moving equipment, gardening, getting up and down off the ground, or going up stairs, you are using at least one of the seven fundamental movements. The FMS shows us if there are any weak links in those movement patterns. It allows us to see how well your body is able to perform basic motor and stabilizing movements. It does this by placing you in positions where weaknesses and imbalances become noticeable if appropriate mobility and motor control is not utilized.

Can you fail the FMS?

No, the FMS is simply a screening tool that allows us to see how your body moves. It helps us to give you the best training possible. We re-screen our members every two to three months to see how their movements have changed. This allows us to make sure your training is current and relevant.

Why screen our clients?

Would you go to an eye doctor that didn’t test your vision before handing you a pair of glasses? Probably not. When you decide you want to start an exercise program, get over a plateau, or set personal records, it is crucial that you are doing movements/exercises that are helping your body, not hurting it. If you don’t have a solid movement foundation you will not be able to reach your full potential. Just like a crack in the foundation of a house, a crack in your movement foundation can cause problems. After we screen you we will know if there are any “cracks,” or exercises that will cause you more harm than good. We will also be able to give you exercises to help improve those movements. When we re-screen you we will hopefully find that those cracks have been repaired and you no longer have issues with that movement. It doesn’t matter if you choose semi-private or group training, every person who walks through our doors will be screened and get an exercise program that is fitted for them.